soybean
The average yield was 50 bushels per acre with all soybeans delivered to the Richardson Pioneer Starbuck location.
 
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, CANADA — Richardson Pioneer recently partnered with the Canadian Foodgrains Bank for its 80-acre CHOICE (Conquering Hunger Overseas Is Community Endeavor) Growing Project. Growing and community projects are ways Canadians can support the work of Canadian Foodgrains Bank to end hunger around the world, Richardson said.

Through various growing projects, groups of people plant, tend and harvest a crop, then sell it to raise money for the Foodgrains Bank. Proceeds from the sale of the crop are then donated to the Foodgrains Bank for hunger relief overseas.

The soybean field that was used for this growing project was located in Elm Creek, Manitoba and volunteers helped combine it on Oct. 14.

Richardson said the soybean field and most inputs for the field were donated by area farmers and crop retailers. The average yield was 50 bushels per acre with all soybeans delivered to the Richardson Pioneer Starbuck location.

Canadian Foodgrains Bank, in conjunction with its members and their partners around the world, said it works to end global hunger by:
  • supporting international programs to meet immediate food needs, reduce malnutrition, and achieve sustainable food security;
  • influencing improvements in national and international policies that contribute to ending global hunger; and
  • increasing and deepening the engagement of Canadians in efforts to end global hunger.

Richardson Pioneer is a division of Richardson International. Richardson is a worldwide handler and merchandiser of all major Canadian-grown grains and oilseeds and a vertically-integrated processor and manufacturer of oats and canola-based products. Richardson has more than 2,500 employees across Canada and the U.S.