Viterra to modernize Port of Vancouver

by World Grain staff
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REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA — Viterra Inc. announced on April 10 that it will invest in excess of C$100 million to modernize and upgrade operations at its Pacific Terminal at Port Metro Vancouver. The project is aimed at modernizing the terminal with enhancements that will increase shipping throughput and capacity, as well as improve current handling and processing procedures.

“Our goal is to create the most efficient port terminal in Canada with unprecedented capability for processing a diverse range of commodities,” Kyle Jeworski, Viterra's president and chief executive officer for North America said. "This is a significant investment spanning several projects, that when completed, will enhance our strategic position on the west coast, and our ability to continue meeting the needs of our destination customers globally."

Some of these projects include the installation of new bulk weighers, upgrades to shipping conveyors and rotary cleaners and improved electrical and dust control systems. The most significant project planned is the installation of a new ship loader system, which is expected to significantly increase shipping capacity and allow for the loading of "post-Panamax" vessels. It is anticipated that all of these initiatives will be completed by 2016 and result in a rated capacity up to 6 million tonnes annually.

"Demand for trade to and from Canada is increasing, and it is essential that Port Metro Vancouver, and terminals within the port, respond with sustainable and well-managed growth," said Robin Silvester, President and Chief Executive Officer at Port Metro Vancouver, "Viterra's operational upgrades are an excellent example of increasing capacity and efficiency within their existing footprint."

Located on the south shore of the Burrard Inlet, Viterra's Pacific Terminal processes and ships a wide variety of agricultural commodities, including peas, canola, flax, lentils, soybeans and corn.

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