Richardson, CWB sign grain handling agreement

by World Grain Staff
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WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, CANADA — Richardson International Limited announced on Aug. 1 that it has signed a grain handling agreement with the Canadian Wheat Board (CWB).

Under the new grain handling agreement, Richardson has committed to accept farmer deliveries of grain for CWB contracts at all of its locations, including its network of Richardson Pioneer grain handling facilities across Western Canada, Tri Lake Agri in Killarney, Manitoba and Westmor Terminals in Morinville, Alberta.

“Richardson is pleased to partner with the CWB and provide farmers with flexible marketing options - whether they are marketing their grain through the CWB or working with Richardson directly to sell their product to end-use customers around the world,” said Curt Vossen, president of Richardson International. “This is one more pricing option that we can offer to our valued customers in this new grain marketing environment.”

CWB president and Chief Executive Officer Ian White said this important alliance will serve Prairie grain farmers who want the benefits of CWB pools.

"With this important agreement, our network of delivery locations for CWB grain has expanded to include the vast majority of elevators in Western Canada," White said. "Farmers can sign CWB contracts, confident that they can deliver grain to a country location nearby. CWB has begun the new crop year in a strong position to add value for Prairie producers as they enter a new grain-marketing era."

With this announcement there are now more than 170 locations across the West where farmers can deliver grain to CWB.

Richardson joins Viterra, Cargill, Louis Dreyfus, Mission Terminal, West Central Road and Rail, South West Terminal, Delmar Commodities, Linear Grain and Agro Source as CWB grain-handling providers. Additional agreements are expected to be reached shortly with the remaining Prairie grain companies, White said.

CWB programs are now available for farmer sign-up. White urged producers to sign their CWB contracts as early as possible if they want guaranteed access into the pools.

"CWB is ready for business in this new grain-marketing era," White said. "Positive collaborations with handling partners will provide Prairie farmers with access to facilities in the country and at port, no matter which marketing model they choose for their grain."

White said CWB pools remain in high demand among western Canadian farmers as a way to earn solid returns and effectively manage their risk.

"One simple CWB pool contract covers sales planning, execution, foreign exchange and risk management," he said. "Farmers will never be left chasing an elusive market high or settling for the bottom of the market. They'll have more time to focus on their crops."

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